delusion, illusion


delusion, illusion
Delusion означает «заблуждение», «иллюзия» и подразумевает ошибочное убеждение, создающее искажённое представление о действительности: to be (to labour) under a delusion (заблуждаться). Delusion часто предполагает нарушение функций мозга и соответствует существительному «мания»: delusion of persecution (мания преследования), delusion of grandeur (мания величия). Illusion имеет значение «обман чувств», «мираж»: optical illusion (оптический обман).

English-Russian dictionary of expressions. 2014.

Смотреть что такое "delusion, illusion" в других словарях:

  • delusion — delusion, illusion, hallucination, mirage denote something which is believed to be or is accepted as being true or real but which is actually false or unreal. Delusion in general implies self deception or deception by others; it may connote a… …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • delusion — delusion, illusion overlap in meaning because both are to do with things wrongly believed or thought for various reasons. There is, however, a distinguishing principle: a delusion is a wrong belief regarded from the point of view of the person… …   Modern English usage

  • illusion — delusion, illusion overlap in meaning because both are to do with things wrongly believed or thought for various reasons. There is, however, a distinguishing principle: a delusion is a wrong belief regarded from the point of view of the person… …   Modern English usage

  • Illusion — Il*lu sion, n. [F. illusion, L. illusio, fr. illudere, illusum, to illude. See {Illude}.] 1. An unreal image presented to the bodily or mental vision; a deceptive appearance; a false show; mockery; hallucination. [1913 Webster] To cheat the eye… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Delusion — De*lu sion . [L. delusio, fr. deludere. See {Delude}.] 1. The act of deluding; deception; a misleading of the mind. Pope. [1913 Webster] 2. The state of being deluded or misled. [1913 Webster] 3. That which is falsely or delusively believed or… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • delusion — noun Etymology: Middle English, from Late Latin delusion , delusio, from deludere Date: 15th century 1. the act of deluding ; the state of being deluded 2. a. something that is falsely or delusively believed or propagated b …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • illusion — il|lu|sion [ıˈlu:ʒən] n [Date: 1300 1400; : French; Origin: Latin illusio, from illudere to make fun of , from ludere to play ] 1.) an idea or opinion that is wrong, especially about yourself →↑delusion illusion that ▪ They suffer from the… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • delusion — [di lo͞o′zhən] n. [ME delusioun < LL delusio < delusus, pp. of deludere] 1. a deluding or being deluded 2. a false belief or opinion 3. Psychiatry a false, persistent belief maintained in spite of evidence to the contrary delusional adj.… …   English World dictionary

  • delusion — [n] misconception, misbelief apparition, blunder, casuistry, chicanery, daydream, deception, deceptiveness, dream, eidolon, error, fallacy, false impression, fancy, fantasy, figment*, fool’s paradise*, ghost, hallucination, head trip*, ignis… …   New thesaurus

  • illusion — [i lo͞o′zhən] n. [ME illusioun < OFr illusion < L illusio, a mocking (in LL(Ec), deceit, illusion) < illusus, pp. of illudere, to mock, play with < in , on + ludere, to play: see LUDICROUS] 1. a false idea or conception; belief or… …   English World dictionary

  • delusion — act of misleading someone, early 15c.; as a form of mental derangement, 1550s, from L. delusionem (nom. delusio) a deceiving, from pp. stem of deludere (see DELUDE (Cf. delude)). Technically, delusion is a belief that, though false, has been… …   Etymology dictionary

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